Reading Guides

READING GUIDES


WHAT IS A READING GUIDE?
  • Not a study guide (post-reading) used to review material for test, etc.
  • Your voice on paper
  • Used to direct students attention
  • Tells them what they should be looking at when they are reading
  • It is not a graded assignment or an assessment (insist on accountability though)
  • Uses a variety of different formats
  • Includes questions at different levels
  • May tell students what to pay particular attention to, what types of questions are being asked, what strategies to use, what problems to watch for, etc.
  • Provides page numbers to help students locate information
  • Can be used for textbooks as well as any reading done in class (or class work)

WHY USE READING GUIDES?
  • Develops reading skills (predicting, skimming, scanning, etc.)
  • Emphasizes content/skills/interrelationships (using skills to find content)
  • Can compensate for differences in students reading levels
  • Facilitates learning (makes sure they are learning)
  • Encourages active reading/learning while promoting problem solving
  • Creates and builds independent

HOW DO I USE A READING GUIDE?
  • Preview the guide beforehand with students
  • Share/review answers/information after completion


TYPES OF READING GUIDES

SELECTIVE READING GUIDE
  • Step by step (with page numbers) guide for modeling appropriate reading behavior
  • Show students HOW to think through a specific text
  • Uses questions combined with signaling to model the way readers interact with the text
  • Begin by determining the overall purpose for the assignment
  • Select sections of reading that are most necessary to meet your purpose
  • Eliminate all irrelevant sections
  • For the relevant sections, determine what a student must do to achieve purpose (step by step)

GUIDE-O-RAMA
  • written guide showing students the way through a chapter/section
  • activates prior knowledge and sets a purpose for reading while guiding students through the text, terms, graphics, and vocabulary found while reading
  • combines a road map with a think aloud
  • allows you to informally coach, talk with, and support students as you guide them through the reading
  • invites you, as the most experienced reader in the room, to open up your mind to the students – showing them how you thought your way through the reading

READING ROAD MAP
  • Uses road signs to show students the rate of reading for different sections/paragraphs
  • Includes a visual of the road to see how far they have come
  • Gives students a mission (assignment/task) and location signs (headings, page numbers, etc.)
  • Road map to indicate points of interest/required attention during the reading “journey”
  • Students may complete with a “traveling companion”

INTERACTIVE READING GUIDE
  • Teacher directs students’ use of strategies while guiding the learning of the content
  • Teacher acts as a conductor and a monitor
  • Uses questions along with instructions on reading the text
  • Designed to lead students through the reading while requiring different kinds of interactions for response
  • Ask a question, add relevant content, page numbers, and interaction level
  • Allows for collaboration and provides motivation for reading assigned material
  • Shows the interaction level of students
I = Individual/Independently P = Pairs (read with a partner)
G = Group (read as a group) W = Whole Class
  • Can use symbols instead of letters

TEXTBOOK ACTIVITY GUIDE (TAG)
  • Includes strategy codes for reading as well as having students self monitor reading using a coding system
  • Helps break reading into meaningful chunks
  • Guides through the text with focus on strategy, process, and self monitoring
  • Requires students to use effective reading skills and learning strategies to internalize information and make connections to prior knowledge
  • Codes instructions (predict, provide a written response, skim, map, etc.)
RR Read and retell in your own words to your partner
DP Discuss with a partner
PP Predict with a partner
P Predict Individually
WR Write a response on your own
SK Skim quickly for purpose stated then discuss with a partner
MOC Map, outline, or chart the information
  • Has students self monitor their thinking by coding thoughts using a symbol
+ I knew that! - new information ? don’t understand
  • Can have students paper clip strip of paper to side of textbook and code their thoughts using the symbols above as they complete each paragraph

INTERLOCKING READING GUIDE
  • State the types of questions being asked (literal-inferential-applied)
  • Groups questions in order by type
  • Questions are not in the order of the reading

NON-INTERLOCKING READING GUIDE
  • Combines all question types (label the type of question)
  • Questions given as they come up in the text